Education

College applications come in due to ACT, optional SAT test scores amid COVID-19

Melanie Urgiles viewed Johns Hopkins University as an “outreach” school.

The first-generation Latina student from Sleepy Hollow High, 25 miles from Manhattan, wasn’t sure she would do well, considering that John Hopkins only accepts 11% of applicants. But when the selective university announced that it would become an “elective test” and would not require SAT or ACT scores for applicants, Urgiles decided to take a chance. And she was far from the only one.

Applications to colleges soared for the 2021-22 school year as thousands of students used the relaxed test score guidelines during COVID-19. American universities saw an average of at least an 11% increase in applications, including public, private and select universities, as well as historically black universities. This is in accordance with the Common App, which offers more than 900 colleges and universities a universal app.

In selected schools, where the acceptance rate is typically less than 50%, the increase was greater: applications increased by an average of 21%.

“The positive side of COVID is that many of these selective institutions have historically had different sets of applications,” said Jenny Rickard, executive director of the Common App. “The pandemic has underscored the importance and value of higher education. Most of the people who were able to work from home or keep their jobs had a college education. ”

“The positive side of COVID is that many of these selective institutions have historically had different sets of applications,” said Jenny Rickard, executive director of the Common App. “The pandemic has underscored the importance and value of higher education. Most of the people who were able to work from home or keep their jobs had a college education. “

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